A simple technique to turn dreams into reality.

How many dreams or great ideas have you ever had and…never followed through?

In memory of Walt Disney whose birthday is today, I thought I would share a simple NLP Technique called the Disney Model; it is based on an approach Walt Disney used when considering how to bring his dreams to reality – and he certainly succeeded didn’t he?

Imagine you have just purchased a cupboard of flat pack furniture; if you attempted to put it together without checking the instructions at all you may end up with bits left over at the end or something that really doesn’t look like the picture on the box.

This can be a similar problem with our dreams or ideas; if we don’t think through the different aspects we may not take the right action or may not achieve what we really want.

The Disney Strategy Model is a very simple approach.  It was developed as a NLP tool by NLP pioneer Robert Dilts who said, “Walt Disney’s ability to connect his innovative creativity with successful business strategy and popular appeal certainly qualifies him as a genius in the field of entertainment. In a way, Disney’s chosen medium of expression, the animated film, characterizes the fundamental process of all genius: the ability to take something that exists in the imagination only and forge it into a physical existence that directly influences the experience of others in a positive way.”

 

When Walt Disney had a plan for a new film he would consider it from 3 perspectives; the Dreamer, the Realist and the Critic and he would use each of these 3 styles one after the other.

Habitually, we will muddle the 3 levels of thinking and therefore this creates confusion, doubt and therefore often limited or no action.  This approach helps to clarify thinking whether for an individual goal or whether for a team and each role should be done in a separate space or location within the room and sequentially.

Step 1 – The Dreamer

This is the first position; the creative position.  Usually creative ideas start with passion and excitement and then are quelled by problems.  In this position though, it is only creative ideas that are brought to the table.  Let your imagination run free, imagine how it will be when achieved and the benefits of doing it.

Step 2 – The Realist

Move to a second position where you consider what needs to happen to turn the dream into a reality.  The aim is to find ways to make it happen and, again, do not be put off by considering blockers, just focus on what has to happen and generate a high level plan to make it happen.

Step 3 – The Critic

Move to the third position and act as the Constructive Critic.  Here you test the plan and look for flaws and loopholes that mean the plan may not work. In Critic role you only interact with the Planner – not with the Dreamer.  Search for weaknesses in the plan and how to pre-empt problems to ensure success but leave the resolution of these to the Planner.

Step 4 – Step Outside

Step into a fourth position and review what you have done so far and how well you are approaching each role.  Are you really challeging yourself in each role? Some roles are more naturual for us than others so consider whether there are any improvements to be made.

Step 5 – Recycle

Depending on the complexity of the goal you may need to recycle through the Realist and Critic stages until you are certain that the plan can be achieved.  The dream need not change, just the way to achieve it!

 

As a NLP Coach and Trainer using this technique works with in different client settings.  It helps with the process of generating creative ideas and translating them into reality by providing a greater clarity of ideas and making the dreams more achievable rather than feeling overwhelming.

How will you use it?

 

If you want to know more about NLP and how it can help you in your perosnal life or your business, then sign up to my newsletter or book yourself on one of my courses at www.tracywardcoaching.co.uk

Tracy Ward,

Your Catalyst for Change

 

“Have you got around to it yet? Or are you still putting it off?”

Today, I weeded the garden.  Not a big deal you might say but I’d been putting it off and putting it off.

I didn’t want to do it and the weeds were growing bigger and bigger and the problem got bigger and bigger in my mind too.

Each time I left the house or came home, I would see the weeds taking over the front garden and when I looked out of the kitchen window I would see them strangling the flowers in the back garden and I would get annoyed with myself that I had not tackled the job.  I would say things like “I really should pull those weeds out” or “I must do that weeding soon”.  And yet saying these things were not motivating me to do the job!

3 tips to doing those jobs you don’t want to do.

  • Focus on the outcome. I was thinking about the problem; the job of weeding and I was putting pressure on myself to do the work by saying “I should” or “I must”.  When you change your thinking to being outcome focussed, then the job is not so difficult.  I focussed on how it would be when I was able to look out of the kitchen window and see the flowers flourishing and how it would be to notice the plants when I came home rather than the weeds.  When you think about the outcome, there is more motivation to get the work done.
  • How can you make it easier? It was a lovely sunny day so it would be far more enjoyable spending the time in the garden today rather than another day when it is cold or wet.  So I decided that it would be worth getting some Vitamin D and play some music while I was doing the job.  Both of those things made it a more enjoyable task.
  • Who can help or keep you company? If you can find somebody to do the work with and keep you company; that makes the job easier too.  I suggested to my hubby that we could get it done twice as quickly together and then we could go and do what we wanted.

In the end, it really didn’t take very long.  It was actually the thought of doing it that was worse.  Once you take the first step, it’s not so bad.

What are you not doing?  What are you putting off? Use these 3 tips to focus your mind on getting those things done that you haven’t got around to doing yet!

 

Do you want to find out how to take control of your life and take responsibility for what you really want!

If you would like to understand more about how NLP can help, sign up to my website or come along to one of my events.  Like riding a bike, you can learn how to do it by reading a book, you can listen to a webinar but the real power of NLP is in experiencing it for yourself.

So come and give it a go and Discover the Power of You!

 

Tracy Ward

Tracy Ward; Your Catalyst for Change

www.tracywardcoaching.co.uk/events

 

“Golf – A game of mindset; just like life”

Whilst watching the Ryder Cup over the weekend, I thought “Wow, golf is a game of mindset” and I thought about how it is a metaphor for life in general.

With most sports you don’t have time to think, it is about reacting in the moment. It may be that the ball is moving or your opponent is moving and so this impacts on how you play the game. In golf, your opponent’s successes or failures may influence your choice of shot in a match play situation but you always have plenty of time to focus on what shot to play and how to play it. This is one of the reasons golf is a very difficult game to play because you need to handle the pressure, your emotions and manage your mindset.

I learned to play golf 30 years ago and the first time I played on a proper course with other people, my first tee shot was a real shocker; it landed on the 18th green and people were putting on it! That would not have been so bad except there were lots of players waiting to follow us and there were a number of “tuts” from those around me. My confidence was completely knocked and since that time, I would be very nervous on the first tee and whenever I did a bad shot I would imagine “tuts” from others and I would question whether I was good enough to be on the golf course.

This would then spiral into other negative emotions where I would start to curse, maybe swear, maybe even throw my clubs around and then I would get very angry with myself and my bad behaviour. It almost became a ritual. It seemed that I would have to go through that negative process before I could start to accept that it was just a game and a bit of fun and then I seemed to play better.

So how can you manage your mindset and your emotions on the golf course?

Here are 3 tips to manage your mindset on the golf course which are just as valuable in eveyday life

1)     Reduce the tension. If you are carrying tension in your body, particularly the top half, it is very difficult to connect with the ball in the correct place and at the right angle. So focus on taking a deep breath before you step up to take your shot and shrug your shoulders and then push them down and purposefully relaxing any tension in the shoulders.  Such simple actions with a huge impact and notice how much cleaner you strike the ball.

2)     Focus on the target; fairways and greens. So often I hear my golfing colleagues say, “I always go in that bunker on this hole” or “I can never get it over the water”.  You may think “I keep slicing it”. When you comment on the hazards, it draws attention to them so they are in your mind and your unconscious will focus on going in the bunker or the water (the same for your slice). So keep your attention on the fairways and greens and visualise the flight of the ball and where you want to pitch the ball. Your unconscious will aim to deliver that through the correct physical swing.

3)     Concentrate on the present. Once you have a done a poor shot (and we all will!) it is important to change the attention to what you can control at that moment. Firstly, your emotions by controlling your breathing and walking tall to keep a feeling of confidence. Then, you can focus on what you can do with your next shot. I always have a few sayings to myself such as “This looks like a good skills test” as that helps me to focus on what I have to do.

So when your game is a bit awry ask yourself “What can I do about that?” The more you are able to let go of the mistakes you have made, forget the impact that may have on your score and focus purely on the present the stronger your game will be.

The person who can maintain their thoughts in the present throughout the 18 holes or the competition is the one who is likely to rise above the rest.

And it is the same approach to take for life in general.

If you want to know more about managing your mindset, please contact me

Tracy Ward

Your Catalyst for Change